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Photo Credit: Ryan Green

Halloween Among Films Slated to Premiere at TIFF’s Midnight Madness

A Star is Born. Beautiful Boy. First Man. If Beale Street Could Talk. Widows. These are a few of the films that will premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), one of the most prestigious film festivals in the world. In the third largest city in North America and with tickets open to the general public, there are few better places to hold a movie premiere. But along with those smaller films, surely to be hits during awards season, Halloween, the sequel to the original Jamie Lee Curtis film, will premiere there a month before its theatre release date.

Halloween is perhaps the greatest brand in all of horror, but seeing a straight horror film, rather than one with crossover appeal like Get Out, on the TIFF roster was a bit surprising. But more than anything, it is incredibly exciting. For Universal Pictures to be comfortable showing David Gordon Green’s film a month prior to release at a festival where critics flock to in droves, they must know this movie is good — so good that putting the film up against some of the best films of this year wouldn’t even make them break a sweat. Horror has made a comeback over the last couple of years, but if this film is as good as Universal is letting on, we could have not only an awards contender, but also a box-office blockbuster on our hands. Kids everywhere will be wearing their Michael Myers masks (not those Mike Myers-Austin Powers ones from Baby Driver, poor JD) every Halloween night. Check back here for first reactions from TIFF!

Here is the synopsis for Halloween:

Jamie Lee Curtis returns to her iconic role as Laurie Strode, who comes to her final confrontation with Michael Myers, the masked figure who has haunted her since she narrowly escaped his killing spree on Halloween night four decades ago.

After its premiere at TIFF, Halloween comes to theaters on October 19.

Featured image: In “Halloween,” JAMIE LEE CURTIS returns to her iconic role as Laurie Strode, who comes to her final confrontation with Michael Myers, the masked figure who has haunted her since she narrowly escaped his killing spree on Halloween night four decades ago. Photo Credit: Ryan Green

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